Corina Gribble | National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Corina Gribble

Interviewee Description Interviewer Date of Interview Location of Interview Affiliation Collection
Dave Cousens and Edwin McKie

In this interview, Dave Cousens—a lobsterman from Waterman's Beach, South Thomaston, ME—and Edwin McKie—a lobsterman from Bay of Fortune, Prince Edward Island, Canada—speak about the social and legal differences between Canadian and U.S. lobster fishing and the projects, such as meetings and the Eastern Maine Skippers Program, that they have worked on together. After meeting sometime between 1998 and 1999, Cousens and McKie have worked together to increase communication and education on the differences between the lobster industry in the U.S. and Canada.

Natalie Springuel, Corina Gribble Rockland, ME Maine Sea Grant, The First Coast, College of the Atlantic, The Island Institute, Maine Fishermen’s Forum Voices of the Maine Fishermen’s Forum 2019
Rodman Sykes

Rodman Sykes, a commercial fisherman from Point Judith, RI, begins his interview by talking about the changes in how young people get into the fishing industry. He focuses on how the advancement of young fishermen from low to high positions is diminishing, which is putting pressure on generations beginning to retire. Secondly, Sykes voices his worries and the foreseeable impacts of the small wind farm off Block Island and the planned 2020 offshore wind farm off Nantucket and Martha’s Vineyard.

Galen Koch, Corina Gribble Rockland, ME Maine Sea Grant, The First Coast, College of the Atlantic, The Island Institute, Maine Fishermen’s Forum Voices of the Maine Fishermen’s Forum 2019
Marc Hoffman

In this interview, Marc Hoffman—from the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission Advisory Panel and based in New York City, NY—talks about his automobile lubricant company M. K. Hoffman Association and shares his perspective and involvement in the 2008 global recession in oil prices and failure of home mortgages. He also talks about his recent book Shell Game.

Natalie Springuel, Corina Gribble Rockland, ME Maine Sea Grant, The First Coast, College of the Atlantic, The Island Institute, Maine Fishermen’s Forum Voices of the Maine Fishermen’s Forum 2019
Anne Hayden

Anne Hayden, senior fisheries program manager at Manomet from Brunswick, ME, talks about her experiences researching river herring restoration in Maine. She touches on the impact of the bait crisis on alewife restoration, her joys in working with fishermen and other stakeholders, and her hopes for the future of the industry.

Corina Gribble , Natalie Springuel Rockland, ME Maine Sea Grant, The First Coast, College of the Atlantic, The Island Institute, Maine Fishermen’s Forum Voices of the Maine Fishermen’s Forum 2019
Steve Train

Steve Train, a commercial fisherman, speaks about the commercial working waterfront on Long Island, ME, and its relationship and dependence on the Portland working waterfront for commercial fishing, education, and the island communities. He highlights the importance of having access to the waterfront and the challenges Long Island has faced with state control of the water and with the attempts to implement aquaculture.

Corina Gribble , Ela Keegan Grand Rapids, MI College of the Atlantic, Maine Sea Grant, The Island Institute, Working Waterfront Festival Collecting Stories at the National Working Waterfronts and Waterways Symposium 2018
Nicole Faghin

Nicole Faghin, a coastal management specialist with Washington Sea Grant based in Seattle, WA, describes her work in the Putrid Sound region of Washington and the challenges of the waterfront having a large industry, land-use conflicts, maritime-related issues, environmental issues, an aging population, and the need to encourage younger generations to work on waterfronts.

Corina Gribble , Ela Keegan Grand Rapids, MI College of the Atlantic, Maine Sea Grant, The Island Institute, National Working Waterfront Network Collecting Stories at the National Working Waterfronts and Waterways Symposium 2018
Michael Wills

From initially moving to Traverse City, MI to open a dive shop, Mike Wills has worked in a variety of waterfront related jobs from working on boats, operating two marinas, opening a community sailing program, and developing three waterfront real estates in downtown Traverse City. He is now the chair of the Discovery Center Great Lakes. As a city that is economically-dependent on the waterfront, Mike describes the current fundraising efforts to help the city develop its waterfront.

Ela Keegan, Corina Gribble Grand Rapids, MI College of the Atlantic, Maine Sea Grant, The Island Institute, National Working Waterfront Network Collecting Stories at the National Working Waterfronts and Waterways Symposium 2018
Meaghan Gass

Meaghan Gass, an extension educator with Michigan Sea Grant based out of Bay City, MI, speaks about her projects on extreme floods and her passion for place-based stewardship education. She highlights the United States’ dependence on the Great Lakes and the interconnectedness of waterfronts. Her work currently includes projects such as reef restoration, invasive species removal, fisheries, and water quality in the Saganon Bay region of Michigan.

 

Corina Gribble , Kaitlyn Clark Grand Rapids, MI College of the Atlantic, Maine Sea Grant, The Island Institute, National Working Waterfront Network Collecting Stories at the National Working Waterfronts and Waterways Symposium 2018
Matt Campo

Matt Campo, a senior research specialist at Rutgers University, speaks about the industrial and commercial uses of waterfronts with a focus on Red Bank, NJ. Highlighting water-dependent businesses, he encourages communication between different commercial uses. He discusses the difficulty of beach badges and land use rights in New Jersey but positively looks towards conversations about resilience and preservation for the public health and social welfare of coastal communities.

Natalie Springuel, Corina Gribble Grand Rapids, MI College of the Atlantic, Maine Sea Grant, The Island Institute, National Working Waterfront Network Collecting Stories at the National Working Waterfronts and Waterways Symposium 2018
Kenneth Walker

Kenneth Walker, a program analyst for NOAA based in Silver Spring, MD, speaks about his view of the national waterfront, why working waterfronts are an important piece of the blue economy, and his attempts to create and share economic and environmental tools for resilience in coastal communities. He addresses various nationwide challenges such as sea level rise and touches on the Portland, ME, waterfront in which he is working on projects highlighting the importance of peer-to-peer learning.

Corina Gribble , Kaitlyn Clark Grand Rapids, MI College of the Atlantic, Maine Sea Grant, The Island Institute, National Working Waterfront Network Collecting Stories at the National Working Waterfronts and Waterways Symposium 2018

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