Corina Gribble | National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Corina Gribble

Interviewee Description Interviewer Date of Interview Location of Interview Affiliation Collection
Hattie Train

As a lobsterman who earned her license at age 8, Hattie Train speaks about her childhood experience on the commercial waterfront and about her observations of the depletion of fishermen on Long Island, ME. Hattie emphasizes the importance of islanders’ say in decision-making regarding their working waterfront and the neighboring waterfronts that they depend on. She highlights the island’s dependence on the fishing community, the impacts of tourism, and the interdependency of waterfronts.

Natalie Springuel, Corina Gribble Grand Rapids, MI College of the Atlantic, Maine Sea Grant, The Island Institute, National Working Waterfront Network Collecting Stories at the National Working Waterfronts and Waterways Symposium 2018
Donald McCann

Donald McCann, a marine surveyor at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science, outlines his job and speaks about the values and challenges (taxes, a diminishing and aging workforce, and lack of public access to the waterfront) of the commercial and recreational waterfront in Fleets Island, VA. He discusses his observations about dredging, the decrease in father-son work on Fleet Island, and Virginia’s master plan for the working waterfront.

Natalie Springuel, Corina Gribble Grand Rapids, MI College of the Atlantic, Maine Sea Grant, The Island Institute, National Working Waterfront Network Collecting Stories at the National Working Waterfronts and Waterways Symposium 2018
Dave Lemberg

Dave Lemberg, a geography professor at Western Michigan University in Kalamazoo, MI, describes the historical use of the Kalamazoo River as a sewer and their recent efforts to diversify its uses as a waterway.

Hattie Train , Corina Gribble Grand Rapids, MI College of the Atlantic, Maine Sea Grant, The Island Institute, National Working Waterfront Network Collecting Stories at the National Working Waterfronts and Waterways Symposium 2018
Bill Needelman

Bill Needelman, the waterfront coordinator for Portland, ME, speaks about his personal and professional connection to the waterfront, which he describes as an engaging and imaginative dimensionless line. He describes the value in having an understanding of marine work and how we can bring people working on the land and the ocean together. He touches upon Portland’s decision to become a port community and how it has become the gateway for the movement of goods through its expansion of port activities.

Corina Gribble , Kaitlyn Clark Grand Rapids, MI College of the Atlantic, Maine Sea Grant, The Island Institute, National Working Waterfront Network Collecting Stories at the National Working Waterfronts and Waterways Symposium 2018
Marina Cucuzza

Marina Cucuzza, a marine researcher from Boston, MA, is currently working on her thesis which assesses the capacity for sustainability in coastal communities. She discusses buzz words such as resilience and sustainability which she finds important to define and what she has come across in her projects so far.

Matt Frassica, Corina Gribble Rockland, ME Maine Fishermen’s Forum, Maine Sea Grant, The First Coast, College of the Atlantic, The Island Institute Voices of the Maine Fishermen's Forum 2018
Marcia Beal Brazer

Marcia Beal Brazer, from Ogunquit, ME, shares a personal story about her husband Norman Brazer, a lobsterman, who got tangled in a lobster buoy rope and fell overboard while fishing near Boon Island, ME. N. Brazer was lucky that he was carrying a knife and was able to untangle himself; however, when he surfaced, he could not find his boat. Luckily, another lobsterman, Mark Sewell, noticed N. Brazer’s body floating and took him to the hospital. After three rounds of CPR, N. Brazer finally responded.

Matt Frassica, Corina Gribble Rockland, ME Maine Fishermen’s Forum, Maine Sea Grant, The First Coast, College of the Atlantic, The Island Institute Voices of the Maine Fishermen's Forum 2018
Congresswoman Chellie Pingree

Chellie Pingree, a United States congresswoman from North Haven, ME, whose work focuses on fisheries policy issues, speaks about her work speaking to local lobstermen and how this year’s conversations have focused on concerns about the future of the fisheries with warming temperatures. She describes her own concerns for the future of her island community and the values and necessities of island life.

Galen Koch, Corina Gribble Rockland, ME Maine Fishermen’s Forum, Maine Sea Grant, The First Coast, College of the Atlantic, The Island Institute Voices of the Maine Fishermen's Forum 2018

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