Collecting Stories at the National Working Waterfronts and Waterways Symposium 2018 | National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Collecting Stories at the National Working Waterfronts and Waterways Symposium 2018

  • Collection DOI:
    Principal Investigator:
    Natalie Springuel
  • Collecting Stories at the National Working Waterfronts and Waterways Symposium 2018 is a project of Maine Sea Grant, College of the Atlantic, the Island Institute, and the National Working Waterfront Network.

Interviewee Collection Sort descending Description Interviewer Date of Interview Location of Interview Affiliation
Chris Kellems Collecting Stories at the National Working Waterfronts and Waterways Symposium 2018

Chris Kellems, a retired sustainable building advisor and passionate citizen of Sturgeon Bay, WI, has observed the struggles of its working waterfront. She attended the NWWWS to gather contacts and examples of successful development and attempts at revitalisation. She discusses her vision for public access to the waterfront, its alternative uses, and the importance of waterfront restoration.

Ela Keegan, Kaitlyn Clark Grand Rapids, MI College of the Atlantic, Maine Sea Grant, The Island Institute, National Working Waterfront Network
Roland Lewis Collecting Stories at the National Working Waterfronts and Waterways Symposium 2018

Roland Lewis, the president and CEO of the Waterfront Alliance, speaks about how New York City, NY, is a critical waterfront for the maritime ecosystem as the largest port on the eastern seaboard. He discusses the impacts of opening the Erie Canal, the wind turbines off the coast of New York, and issues of zoning of waterfront and maritime facilities. He highlights successes of his work communicating between waterfront-based activities and the importance of having political leaders engaged with the working waterfront.

Alexa Wutt , Kaitlyn Clark Grand Rapids, MI Michigan Sea Grant, College of the Atlantic, Maine Sea Grant, The Island Institute, National Working Waterfront Network
Dave Alexander Collecting Stories at the National Working Waterfronts and Waterways Symposium 2018

Dave Alexander, the executive director of Downtown Muskegon Now, speaks about the history of the Muskegon Lake, MI, waterfront and how it has brought vitality to the economy and spiritual connections for local inhabitants through having public access to the waterfront with heritage landings and bike trails along the lake.

Alexa Wutt , Kaitlyn Clark Grand Rapids, MI College of the Atlantic, Maine Sea Grant, The Island Institute, National Working Waterfront Network, Michigan Sea Grant
Russ Brohl Collecting Stories at the National Working Waterfronts and Waterways Symposium 2018

Russ Brohl, a retired ship captain and member of the port authority, speaks about South Bass Island, OH—which has a service and tourism driven economy—and its attempts to shift from being a party island to a family destination. He speaks about the importance of protecting the heritage of the area such as the vineyards and voices his concerns relating to tourism, the threat of algal blooms, and invasive species.

Natalie Springuel, Ela Keegan Grand Rapids, MI College of the Atlantic, Maine Sea Grant, The Island Institute, National Working Waterfront Network
Dave Lemberg Collecting Stories at the National Working Waterfronts and Waterways Symposium 2018

Dave Lemberg, a geography professor at Western Michigan University in Kalamazoo, MI, describes the historical use of the Kalamazoo River as a sewer and their recent efforts to diversify its uses as a waterway.

Hattie Train , Corina Gribble Grand Rapids, MI College of the Atlantic, Maine Sea Grant, The Island Institute, National Working Waterfront Network
Steve Train Collecting Stories at the National Working Waterfronts and Waterways Symposium 2018

Steve Train, a commercial fisherman, speaks about the commercial working waterfront on Long Island, ME, and its relationship and dependence on the Portland working waterfront for commercial fishing, education, and the island communities. He highlights the importance of having access to the waterfront and the challenges Long Island has faced with state control of the water and with the attempts to implement aquaculture.

Corina Gribble , Ela Keegan Grand Rapids, MI College of the Atlantic, Maine Sea Grant, The Island Institute, Working Waterfront Festival
Donald McCann Collecting Stories at the National Working Waterfronts and Waterways Symposium 2018

Donald McCann, a marine surveyor at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science, outlines his job and speaks about the values and challenges (taxes, a diminishing and aging workforce, and lack of public access to the waterfront) of the commercial and recreational waterfront in Fleets Island, VA. He discusses his observations about dredging, the decrease in father-son work on Fleet Island, and Virginia’s master plan for the working waterfront.

Natalie Springuel, Corina Gribble Grand Rapids, MI College of the Atlantic, Maine Sea Grant, The Island Institute, National Working Waterfront Network
Willis Spear Jr. Collecting Stories at the National Working Waterfronts and Waterways Symposium 2018

Willis Spears Jr. speaks about his 54 years as a commercial fisherman off of Cousins Island, ME, focusing on the history of shrimping, the differences between dragging and trapping shrimp, and the changes in the Portland working waterfront over his lifetime. He describes the interaction between fishermen and Portland authorities in their efforts to advocate for the fishing community’s needs and emphasizes the importance of passing information and knowledge to future generations.

Natalie Springuel, Ela Keegan Grand Rapids, MI College of the Atlantic, Maine Sea Grant, The Island Institute, National Working Waterfront Network
Duke Marshall and Mark Nelson Collecting Stories at the National Working Waterfronts and Waterways Symposium 2018

Duke Marshall, a market owner, and Mark Nelson, an accountant, attended the NWWWS to get ideas because Smith island, MD—a small community struggling to retain a year round population, a younger population, and therefore a local culture—is in a time of transition. Their interview focuses on Smith Island’s resilient past with Hurricane Sandy and their plans for the future with the success of creating Smith Island United, which gives them a united voice to advocate for the island.

Natalie Springuel, Ela Keegan Grand Rapids, MI College of the Atlantic, Maine Sea Grant, The Island Institute, National Working Waterfront Network
Hattie Train Collecting Stories at the National Working Waterfronts and Waterways Symposium 2018

As a lobsterman who earned her license at age 8, Hattie Train speaks about her childhood experience on the commercial waterfront and about her observations of the depletion of fishermen on Long Island, ME. Hattie emphasizes the importance of islanders’ say in decision-making regarding their working waterfront and the neighboring waterfronts that they depend on. She highlights the island’s dependence on the fishing community, the impacts of tourism, and the interdependency of waterfronts.

Natalie Springuel, Corina Gribble Grand Rapids, MI College of the Atlantic, Maine Sea Grant, The Island Institute, National Working Waterfront Network