Rockland, ME

Interviewee Collection Sort descending Description Interviewer Date of Interview Location of Interview Affiliation
Howie Edwards Assessing Vulnerability and Resilience in Maine Fishing Communities

Interview with Howie Edwards, who was born in Rockland, Maine. In this oral history interview, he describes changes in the community of Rockland as well as the canning industry.

Cameron Thompson Rockland, ME University of Maine
Roger Freeman Assessing Vulnerability and Resilience in Maine Fishing Communities

Interview with Rockland lobsterman Roger Freeman, born April 22,1949 in Rockland, ME. At the time of the interview, Mr. Freeman was still living in Rockland. The interview contains information about Mr. Freeman's career fishing for lobsters. He describes his entry into the lobster industry in 1973 and the changes that he witnessed in gear, species fluctuations, prices and regulations.

Cameron Thompson Rockland, ME University of Maine
William Kirk Assessing Vulnerability and Resilience in Maine Fishing Communities

William Kirk, born in 1947, is a lifelong resident of Rockland, Maine. He is the first member of his family to work in the fishing industry, having entered the lobstering fishery independently in 1967 to supplement his income from working at a clothing factory in town. Despite the significant increase in the cost of bait and other operating costs over the years, Kirk continues to actively lobster, selling his lobsters locally throughout his career. He has two sons, one of whom works with him in the lobstering business while the other works for a fishing company.

Cameron Thompson Rockland, ME University of Maine
Richard A. Whitman Assessing Vulnerability and Resilience in Maine Fishing Communities

Richard A. Whitman is a seasoned fisherman with deep roots in Rockland, Maine, where he has spent his entire life of 48 years. Born into a family with Italian and Sicilian heritage, Whitman's connection to the sea and fishing is a product of both his lineage and his environment. From a young age, he was drawn to the waters that have long provided sustenance and livelihood to the people of Rockland. Over the years, Whitman has gained extensive experience in various sectors of the fishing industry, mastering techniques for catching herring, salmon, scallop, lobster, and shrimp.

Cameron Thompson Rockland, ME University of Maine
Allison Wilson Assessing Vulnerability and Resilience in Maine Fishing Communities

Allison Wilson Jr. was born in 1931, in Rockland. He has lived in Port Clyde, Maine, for almost eighty-one years, with twenty-four of those years spent in his current residence at 98 Horse Point Road. Wilson comes from a family with roots in Nova Scotia, with his ancestors having migrated to Port Clyde, where they built a log cabin before returning to Nova Scotia, and then coming back the following year. He estimates that he is the sixth or seventh generation of his family in the area.

Cameron Thompson Rockland, ME University of Maine
Shey Conover Voices from the Working Waterfront Oral History Project

Biographical Note:
Shey Conover is the Chief Operating Officer at the Island Institute in Rockland, Maine. She was born on March 5, 1980.

Julia Beaty Rockland, ME National Working Waterfront Network, National Sea Grant Law Center, NOAA Office of Coastal Management, Maine Sea Grant College Program, NOAA Preserve America Initiative
Dan Harriman Voices of the Maine Fishermen's Forum 2018

Dan Harriman is a fisherman who operates the state’s last mackerel weir in Cape Elizabeth, ME. His family came to the US from Denmark in the 1980s. He speaks about his experience fishing and discusses the issues he sees in the fishing industry such as unsustainability and lack of access. He believes these challenges stem from knowledge not being passed between generations and suggests that change needs to come from the bottom up.

Galen Koch, Matt Frassica Rockland, ME Maine Fishermen’s Forum, Maine Sea Grant, The First Coast, College of the Atlantic, The Island Institute
Paul Molyneaux Voices of the Maine Fishermen's Forum 2018

Paul Molyneaux, an author, journalist, and former urchin harvester and fisherman from Milbridge, ME, speaks about the capitalism and economics of the fishing industry. He also speaks about his experiences winkling for periwinkle snails and diving for sea urchins as well as participating in the governance of the sea urchin fishery.

Matt Frassica Rockland, ME Maine Fishermen’s Forum, Maine Sea Grant, The First Coast, College of the Atlantic, The Island Institute
David, Cynthia, and Emily Thomas Voices of the Maine Fishermen's Forum 2018

David, Cynthia, and Emily Thomas are from Islesford, Cranberry Islands, ME. David is a retired school teacher and lobsterman, Cynthia works at the island library, and their daughter Emily attended college and now works in Nova Scotia, CA, though she grew up on the Cranberry Islands. They speak about the diversification of Islesford, temperature impacting the location of lobsters, and changes in island life, such as setting up reliable internet service but losing the island store.

Matt Frassica, Teagan White Rockland, ME Maine Fishermen’s Forum, Maine Sea Grant, The First Coast, College of the Atlantic, The Island Institute
Phoebe Jekielek Voices of the Maine Fishermen's Forum 2018

Phoebe Jekielek, an education program leader on Hurricane Island, ME, speaks about the realities and importance of working with students on Hurricane Island. She discusses changes she has observed through her years of work and the successes and challenges of aquaculture in education.

Rebecca Clark Uchena Rockland, ME Maine Fishermen’s Forum, Maine Sea Grant, The First Coast, College of the Atlantic, The Island Institute