Structure from Motion: Oral History of Reef Mapping in Hawaii

  • Collection DOI:
    Principal Investigator:
    Zachary Mason
Interviewee Collection Sort descending Description Interviewer Date of Interview Location of Interview Affiliation
Mariko Quinn Structure from Motion: Oral History of Reef Mapping in Hawaii

Mariko Quinn, also known as Mari, is a passionate marine science enthusiast and a junior at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. Growing up in Hawaii near Kaneohe Bay, her love for the ocean was deeply influenced by her father, a boat captain, and her upbringing near the water. Witnessing a coral bleaching event in 2015 sparked Mari's interest in marine life and coral reefs. In response, she conducted a science fair project to track the recovery of 24 individual coral colonies in her local reef, discovering the impact of environmental stressors and the resilience of some coral colonies.

Lexie Sturm Manoa, HI
Alika Garcia Structure from Motion: Oral History of Reef Mapping in Hawaii

Alika is a Native Hawaiian with a strong connection to his island home of Oahu, where he was born and raised. He comes from a family with a long history of subsistence fishing, and this heritage has shaped his deep appreciation for the marine environment. Alika pursued his passion for marine biology and aquaculture at the University of Hawaii, Manoa, where he actively participated in the Scientific Diving group. During his time at university, he conducted valuable coral reef surveys across the Hawaiian islands.

Zachary Mason Honolulu, HI
Curt Storlazzi Structure from Motion: Oral History of Reef Mapping in Hawaii

Dr. Curt Storlazzi, Ph.D., is a prominent coastal scientist with a strong focus on coastal and marine research. He holds a Ph.D. in Earth Sciences from the University of California at Santa Cruz (UCSC) and a B.Sc. in Geology from the University of Delaware. Dr. Storlazzi has over two decades of experience and currently serves as a Research Geologist and Oceanographer in the USGS Coastal and Marine Hazards and Resources Program. Simultaneously, he is a Research Associate at UCSC's Institute for Marine Sciences.

Madyson Miller Santa Cruz, CA NOAA Heritage Program
Kamealoha Smith and Konohiki Kahaunaele Structure from Motion: Oral History of Reef Mapping in Hawaii

Kamealoha Smith is a prominent figure in the Hawaiian community, known for his deep understanding and respect for the traditional Hawaiian resource management system, the moku system. Smith's work revolves around the preservation and application of this ancestral system, which involves the careful management of natural resources by different chiefs under the main chief of the island. He is also a strong advocate for the concept of "kuliana," a Hawaiian term meaning responsibility, which he believes is a reflection of how Native Hawaiian people feel towards the land.

Zachary Mason, Lexie Sturm Hanalei, HI NOAA Heritage Program
Ku'ulei Rodgers Structure from Motion: Oral History of Reef Mapping in Hawaii

Ku‘ulei has been working at the Hawai’i Institute of Marine Biology’s Coral Reef Ecology Lab since 1992 under the direction of Drs. Paul Jokiel and Fenny Cox, as an HIMB faculty member since 2005 and as the Principal Investigator of the Coral Reef Ecology Lab since 2016. Over 100 articles have been published in peer-reviewed journals, published reports, and conference proceedings. She was in the top five most read PeerJ journal articles in 2017.

Zachary Mason Kaneohe, HI NOAA Heritage Program, Coral Reef Conservation Program
Ved Chirayath Structure from Motion: Oral History of Reef Mapping in Hawaii

Professor Chirayath grew up in Southern California with a passion for NASA's mission and space exploration. In 2003, a sophomore in high school, he modified a consumer digital camera and telescope to successfully detect an extra-solar planet, 150 light years away, roughly twice the size of Jupiter. Since then, his research interests have relied on the intersection of multiple disciplines, including aeronautics, astrophysics, earth sciences, engineering, and optics.  

Zachary Mason, Madyson Miller Miami, FL
Kahu M. Kalani Souza Structure from Motion: Oral History of Reef Mapping in Hawaii

Kalani is the Founding and current Director of the Olohana Foundation, a 501(c)(3) non-profit based on Hawaii’s Big Island since 2008. Olohana focuses on building community capacity, cohesiveness, resilience, and emergency preparedness around food, energy, water, and knowledge systems. Kalani is also a Coastal Community Resilience Trainer with FEMA Consortium member, the National Disaster Preparedness Training Center at the University of Hawaii, in Honolulu, Hawaii.

Madyson Miller Paauilo, HI
Ryan Okano Structure from Motion: Oral History of Reef Mapping in Hawaii

Ryan Okano works for the Division of Aquatic Resources for the State of Hawaii.  

Madyson Miller Mililani, HI