Key West, FL

Interviewee Collection Sort descending Description Interviewer Date of Interview Location of Interview Affiliation
Glenn Evans and Mark Nease Changes in the Florida Keys Marine Ecosystem Based Upon Interviews with Experienced Residents

Glenn Evans and Mark Nease are two divers/boat captains with extensive experience and knowledge about the marine ecosystem of the Florida Keys. Glenn Evans, a seasoned marine biologist, has spent a significant portion of his career studying the changes in the marine ecosystem, with a particular focus on water conditions such as clarity, algae blooms, and visibility. His work has contributed significantly to the understanding of the impact of environmental changes on marine life.

Karen DeMaria Key West, FL The Nature Conservancy, The Center for Marine Conservation
Dave Nolan Changes in the Florida Keys Marine Ecosystem Based Upon Interviews with Experienced Residents

Dave Nolan is a long-time resident of the Keys, having lived there for thirteen years. Prior to his move, he served in the Navy and was stationed in Japan. Nolan is currently in his late forties, soon to turn fifty. He first visited the Keys in the early 1960s before eventually deciding to settle there. Nolan earned a four-year college degree, and attended graduate school. After leaving the Navy, he initially worked in the charter boat industry before transitioning to his current role as the director of the AIDS Prevention Center.

Karen DeMaria Key West, FL The Nature Conservancy, The Center for Marine Conservation
Bill Wickers Changes in the Florida Keys Marine Ecosystem Based Upon Interviews with Experienced Residents

Bill Wickers is a lifelong resident of the Keys, having spent 46 years in the area. He has been a charter boat captain for approximately 24 years, a profession he took up after a four-year stint as a school teacher. Even during his teaching years, Wickers was involved in charter fishing, often spending his weekends and vacations on the water. His experience on the water is extensive, with an average of five to six days a week spent on the water over the years.

Karen DeMaria Key West, FL The Nature Conservancy, The Center for Marine Conservation
Victoria Impallomeni Changes in the Florida Keys Marine Ecosystem Based Upon Interviews with Experienced Residents

Vicki Impallomeni is a wilderness guide and charter fishing captain with a rich history of navigating the waters of the Florida Keys. Her life has been deeply intertwined with the sea, having spent countless hours steering her vessel through the intricate waterways of this unique archipelago. Impallomeni's expertise extends beyond mere navigation; she possesses an intimate knowledge of the local marine environment, acquired through years of observation and interaction with the natural elements of the region.

Karen DeMaria Key West, FL The Nature Conservancy, The Center for Marine Conservation
Art Barton Changes in the Florida Keys Marine Ecosystem Based Upon Interviews with Experienced Residents

Art Barton, long-time resident of Key West, Florida, a fishing guide with a deep-rooted history and connection to the area. His first visit to the region was around 1962 or 1963, and he became a regular visitor thereafter. In 1972, after retiring, he decided to make Key West his permanent home, initially living there only during the winter months. By 1978, he had transitioned to living in Key West year-round and has remained there ever since. Barton is deeply involved in the local fishing industry, both as a hobby and a profession.

Karen DeMaria Key West, FL The Nature Conservancy, The Center for Marine Conservation
Billy Deans Changes in the Florida Keys Marine Ecosystem Based Upon Interviews with Experienced Residents

Billy Deans, a long-time resident of the Florida Keys, has been living in the area since December 1968. He moved to the region when he was in the ninth grade. Deans has always been drawn to the water, a fascination that began when he first crossed the Seven Mile Bridge and was captivated by the clarity of the water. He initially lived on Stock Island from 1968 to 1980, after which he moved to Sugarloaf, where he has resided since. Deans is a University of Florida graduate with a degree in Chemistry.

Karen DeMaria Key West, FL The Nature Conservancy, The Center for Marine Conservation
Peter Gladding Changes in the Florida Keys Marine Ecosystem Based Upon Interviews with Experienced Residents

Narrator Peter Gladding of Key West, Florida was a commercial fisherman at the time of the interview.
 

Karen DeMaria Key West, FL The Nature Conservancy, The Center for Marine Conservation
Blondel Handcock Changes in the Florida Keys Marine Ecosystem Based Upon Interviews with Experienced Residents

Blondel Handcock is a seasoned fisherman with a rich history in the industry. Handcock has spent a significant portion of his life in the fishing industry, with his career spanning from 1976 to 1978. His experiences have not only been confined to his birthplace, but he also had the opportunity to work in Europe. Handcock's expertise in the field is evident in his detailed knowledge of fishing practices and the industry's dynamics. He has a deep understanding of the value of certain fishing practices and the implications of not adhering to them.

Karen DeMaria Key West, FL The Nature Conservancy, The Center for Marine Conservation
Bob Holston and Cecelia Raycroft Changes in the Florida Keys Marine Ecosystem Based Upon Interviews with Experienced Residents

Bob Holston and Cecelia Raycroft are long-time residents of the Florida Keys, with a deep connection to the local marine environment. Bob Holston, a former Navy serviceman, has been diving since the early 1970s. After leaving the Navy in 1972, he opened a dive shop, which has been his primary occupation ever since. His experience in the Navy and subsequent years of diving have given him a wealth of knowledge about the local marine ecosystems and the challenges they face. Cecelia Raycroft, on the other hand, has lived in the Keys her entire life, which spans over forty-four years.

Karen DeMaria Key West, FL The Nature Conservancy, The Center for Marine Conservation
John Koenig Changes in the Florida Keys Marine Ecosystem Based Upon Interviews with Experienced Residents

John Koenig is a long-time resident of the Florida Keys with extensive experience on the waters surrounding the archipelago. His life has been deeply intertwined with the marine environment, giving him a unique and personal perspective on the ecological changes that have occurred over the years. Koenig's firsthand knowledge comes from years of direct interaction with the marine ecosystem, particularly through fishing, which has been both a passion and a way of life for him.

Karen DeMaria Key West, FL The Nature Conservancy, The Center for Marine Conservation