Rhonda Wayner | National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Rhonda Wayner

Location of Interview
Collection Name

Women in Alaska Fisheries

This oral history project focuses on Native Alaska women engaged in Bristol Bay fisheries. Women play a major role in maintaining set net permits and are critical to sustaining small-scale fisheries in Alaska and the communities who depend on them. Interviews were conducted with women of various ages who have participated in commercial and/ or subsistence salmon fisheries.

Interviewer
Date of Interview
09-08-2017
Transcribers

Kim Sparks

Audio
Biographical Sketch

Rhonda discusses her history in the fishery, environmental changes she's witnessed, as well as family bonds that are created through fishing. This interview is part of the Alaska Native Fisherwomen of Bristol Bay oral history project, a partnership between NOAA Fisheries Alaska Fisheries Science Center and Bristol Bay Native Association.

Capturing History and Forging the Future: Alaska Native Women in Fisheries. Anna Lavoie, Kim Sparks and Jean Lee (Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission), and NOAA Fisheries, Alaska Fisheries Science Center (AFSC). 2017-2018. Support provided by Bristol Bay Native Association. Funding provided by the NOAA Preserve America Initiative and AFSC. Interviews are accessed on NOAA's Voices from the Fisheries website at www.voices.nmfs.noaa.gov.


Please reach out  Voices@noaa.gov to let us know how these interviews are being used in your research, project, exhibit, etc.  The Voices staff can help provide other useful resources related to your inquiry. 

The NOAA mission is to understand and predict changes in climate, weather, oceans, and coasts, to share that knowledge and information with others, and to conserve and manage coastal and marine ecosystems and resources. The Voices Oral History Archives offers public access to a wide range of accounts, including historical materials that are products of their particular times, and may contain offensive language or negative stereotypes.

Voices Oral History Archives does not verify the accuracy of materials submitted to us. The opinions expressed in the interviews are those of the interviewee only. The interviews here have been made available to the public only after the interviewer has confirmed that they have obtained consent.