Kaitlyn Clark | National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Kaitlyn Clark

Interviewee Description Interviewer Date of Interview Location of Interview Affiliation Collection
Roland Lewis

Roland Lewis, the president and CEO of the Waterfront Alliance, speaks about how New York City, NY, is a critical waterfront for the maritime ecosystem as the largest port on the eastern seaboard. He discusses the impacts of opening the Erie Canal, the wind turbines off the coast of New York, and issues of zoning of waterfront and maritime facilities. He highlights successes of his work communicating between waterfront-based activities and the importance of having political leaders engaged with the working waterfront.

Alexa Wutt , Kaitlyn Clark Grand Rapids, MI Michigan Sea Grant, College of the Atlantic, Maine Sea Grant, The Island Institute, National Working Waterfront Network Collecting Stories at the National Working Waterfronts and Waterways Symposium 2018
Meaghan Gass

Meaghan Gass, an extension educator with Michigan Sea Grant based out of Bay City, MI, speaks about her projects on extreme floods and her passion for place-based stewardship education. She highlights the United States’ dependence on the Great Lakes and the interconnectedness of waterfronts. Her work currently includes projects such as reef restoration, invasive species removal, fisheries, and water quality in the Saganon Bay region of Michigan.

 

Corina Gribble , Kaitlyn Clark Grand Rapids, MI College of the Atlantic, Maine Sea Grant, The Island Institute, National Working Waterfront Network Collecting Stories at the National Working Waterfronts and Waterways Symposium 2018
Kenneth Walker

Kenneth Walker, a program analyst for NOAA based in Silver Spring, MD, speaks about his view of the national waterfront, why working waterfronts are an important piece of the blue economy, and his attempts to create and share economic and environmental tools for resilience in coastal communities. He addresses various nationwide challenges such as sea level rise and touches on the Portland, ME, waterfront in which he is working on projects highlighting the importance of peer-to-peer learning.

Corina Gribble , Kaitlyn Clark Grand Rapids, MI College of the Atlantic, Maine Sea Grant, The Island Institute, National Working Waterfront Network Collecting Stories at the National Working Waterfronts and Waterways Symposium 2018
Kathy Evans

Kathy Evans, the environmental program manager for the West Michigan Shoreline Development Commission, first became involved with working waterfronts through the clean up and sustainable redevelopment of the Muskegon, MI, waterfront. In her interview, she talks about clean up efforts and their attempts to foster a water-dependent economy in place of the unsustainable, industrial  economy of Muskegon’s past.

Hattie Train , Kaitlyn Clark Grand Rapids, MI University of Maine, College of the Atlantic, Maine Sea Grant, The Island Institute, National Working Waterfront Network Collecting Stories at the National Working Waterfronts and Waterways Symposium 2018
Joseph Lane

Joseph Lane, a academic instructor in geography from Kalamazoo, MI, focuses on the his interest in guided educational tourism of the Great Lakes and his work with lighthouse and waterfront tourism. He describes the touristic, historical, and cultural values of lighthouses in Michigan, highlighting how they can develop tourism.

Alexa Wutt , Kaitlyn Clark Grand Rapids, MI Michigan Sea Grant, College of the Atlantic, Maine Sea Grant, The Island Institute, National Working Waterfront Network Collecting Stories at the National Working Waterfronts and Waterways Symposium 2018
Dave Alexander

Dave Alexander, the executive director of Downtown Muskegon Now, speaks about the history of the Muskegon Lake, MI, waterfront and how it has brought vitality to the economy and spiritual connections for local inhabitants through having public access to the waterfront with heritage landings and bike trails along the lake.

Alexa Wutt , Kaitlyn Clark Grand Rapids, MI College of the Atlantic, Maine Sea Grant, The Island Institute, National Working Waterfront Network, Michigan Sea Grant Collecting Stories at the National Working Waterfronts and Waterways Symposium 2018
Chris Kellems

Chris Kellems, a retired sustainable building advisor and passionate citizen of Sturgeon Bay, WI, has observed the struggles of its working waterfront. She attended the NWWWS to gather contacts and examples of successful development and attempts at revitalisation. She discusses her vision for public access to the waterfront, its alternative uses, and the importance of waterfront restoration.

Ela Keegan, Kaitlyn Clark Grand Rapids, MI College of the Atlantic, Maine Sea Grant, The Island Institute, National Working Waterfront Network Collecting Stories at the National Working Waterfronts and Waterways Symposium 2018
Bill Needelman

Bill Needelman, the waterfront coordinator for Portland, ME, speaks about his personal and professional connection to the waterfront, which he describes as an engaging and imaginative dimensionless line. He describes the value in having an understanding of marine work and how we can bring people working on the land and the ocean together. He touches upon Portland’s decision to become a port community and how it has become the gateway for the movement of goods through its expansion of port activities.

Corina Gribble , Kaitlyn Clark Grand Rapids, MI College of the Atlantic, Maine Sea Grant, The Island Institute, National Working Waterfront Network Collecting Stories at the National Working Waterfronts and Waterways Symposium 2018
Adam Mistler

Adam Mistler, the national outreach manager for Ocean Conservancy in Washington, DC, attempts to engage with people nationally to make local concerns a “national chorus” through connections between people working on similar issues. He speaks about how waterfronts are connected by issues of access and highlights the importance of communicating “voice to voice.”

Kaitlyn Clark, Ela Keegan Grand Rapids, MI College of the Atlantic, Maine Sea Grant, The Island Institute, National Working Waterfront Network Collecting Stories at the National Working Waterfronts and Waterways Symposium 2018
Annie Turek, Catherine Smith-Buchalski, and Joe Seidelmann

Annie Turek and Catherine Smith-Buchalski, staff in the Illinois Department of Natural Resources Coastal Management Program, and Joe Seidelmann, the general manager of the Waukegan Port District, speak about their work in the revitalisation of Chicago and Waukegan, IL. They explain their vision of working toward a mix of industrial and recreational uses of their waterfronts and highlight their aim as a relatively new waterfront to work together with waterfront communities around the Great Lakes.

Ela Keegan, Kaitlyn Clark Grand Rapids, MI College of the Atlantic, Maine Sea Grant, The Island Institute, National Working Waterfront Network Collecting Stories at the National Working Waterfronts and Waterways Symposium 2018