Galen Koch | National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Galen Koch

Interviewee Description Interviewer Date of Interview Location of Interview Affiliation Collection
Tom Duym

Tom Duym, from Lamoine, ME, shares his decade-long experience as an educator dedicated to supporting high school students from fishing backgrounds in developing skills and knowledge that are relevant to their career interests and will empower them as community members.

Galen Koch, Giulia Cardoso Rockland, ME Maine Sea Grant, The First Coast, College of the Atlantic, The Island Institute, Maine Fishermen’s Forum Voices of the Maine Fishermen’s Forum 2019
Freda McKie and Edwin McKie

Edwin and Freda McKie talk about what it means to go lobstering on Prince Edward Island (PEI), Canada, touching upon the gear they use, the regulations in place, and the different social dynamics on different parts of PEI. This leads into a comparison with how the fishery is run and regulated and it brings back memories of Maine lobstermen and students visiting PEI in recent years.

Galen Koch, Giulia Cardoso Rockland, ME Maine Sea Grant, The First Coast, College of the Atlantic, The Island Institute, Maine Fishermen’s Forum Voices of the Maine Fishermen’s Forum 2019
John Cox

John Cox, a clam manager in Jonesboro, ME, gives his opinion on topics relevant to someone working on flats. Through a thick Downeast accent, Cox talks about the business acumen that fishermen ought to have, the impact of green crabs, and the opportunities and pitfalls presented by farming.

Galen Koch Rockland, ME Maine Sea Grant, The First Coast, College of the Atlantic, The Island Institute, Maine Fishermen’s Forum Voices of the Maine Fishermen’s Forum 2019
John Mitchell, Joey Evangelista, Jamie Campbell, and Steven Kenney

John Mitchell, Joey Evangelista, Jamie Campbell, and Steven Kenney are high school students from Mount Desert Island, ME, who were part of the Maine Center for Coastal Fisheries’ Eastern Maine Skippers Program as well as commercial fishermen of their own. In this interview, they share their work done through the Skippers Program, their appreciation of island life, and their experiences in the industry as young fishermen.

Galen Koch, Giulia Cardoso Rockland, ME Maine Sea Grant, The First Coast, College of the Atlantic, The Island Institute, Maine Fishermen’s Forum Voices of the Maine Fishermen’s Forum 2019
Mary Beth Tooley

Mary Beth Tooley, an employee for O’Hara Corporations from Lincolnville, ME, talks about the looming issue of bait shortage and how it is affecting O’Hara’s business, her personal life, and the well-being of her community. 

Galen Koch, Giulia Cardoso Rockland, ME Maine Sea Grant, The First Coast, College of the Atlantic, The Island Institute, Maine Fishermen’s Forum Voices of the Maine Fishermen’s Forum 2019
Rodman Sykes

Rodman Sykes, a commercial fisherman from Point Judith, RI, begins his interview by talking about the changes in how young people get into the fishing industry. He focuses on how the advancement of young fishermen from low to high positions is diminishing, which is putting pressure on generations beginning to retire. Secondly, Sykes voices his worries and the foreseeable impacts of the small wind farm off Block Island and the planned 2020 offshore wind farm off Nantucket and Martha’s Vineyard.

Galen Koch, Corina Gribble Rockland, ME Maine Sea Grant, The First Coast, College of the Atlantic, The Island Institute, Maine Fishermen’s Forum Voices of the Maine Fishermen’s Forum 2019
Daniel Devereaux

Daniel Devereaux, from Brunswick, ME, is harbor master, clam warden, and cofounder of Mere Point Oyster Company in Maquoit Bay. In this interview, he talks about the problems that his new farm is facing at the hands of coastal property owners, how those conflicts are being resolved, how aquaculture ought to be accepted by environmentalists, and the continuing gentrification of the Maine coast.

Galen Koch, Griffin Pollock Rockland, ME Maine Sea Grant, The First Coast, College of the Atlantic, The Island Institute, Maine Fishermen’s Forum Voices of the Maine Fishermen’s Forum 2019
Herbert Carter, Jr.

Herbert Carter Jr., a commercial shellfish harvester from Deer Isle, ME, speaks about the impacts of high levels of soot in the water around Deer Isle caused by mussel dragging. Carter describes his observations during the 64 years he has lived and worked on this coast and his current work to reintroduce mussel beds.

Galen Koch Rockland, ME Maine Sea Grant, The First Coast, College of the Atlantic, The Island Institute, Maine Fishermen’s Forum Voices of the Maine Fishermen’s Forum 2019
Hallie Arno

Hallie Arno, a student at College of the Atlantic (COA) in Bar Harbor, ME, speaks about her experiences moving to Maine and beginning to work around the ocean. She has a deep interest for aquaculture, which has driven her to take marine focused courses at COA and brought her to the Fishermen’s Forum. Arno focuses on her own experiences conducting research on the coast of Maine, living in small communities, and her hopes for the implementation of aquaculture at COA.

Galen Koch Rockland, ME Maine Sea Grant, The First Coast, College of the Atlantic, The Island Institute, Maine Fishermen’s Forum Voices of the Maine Fishermen’s Forum 2019
Paul Anderson

Paul Anderson, a scientist and executive director for the Maine Center for Coastal Fisheries from Winterport, ME, talks about the encouraging trend of collaboration between scientists and fishermen in Maine, the necessary growth of citizen science on the coast, the failure of scientists at large to adequately address the problems posed by climate change, and the importance of integrating aquaculture into the larger Gulf of Maine ecosystem.

Galen Koch, Griffin Pollock Rockland, ME Maine Sea Grant, The First Coast, College of the Atlantic, The Island Institute, Maine Fishermen’s Forum Voices of the Maine Fishermen’s Forum 2019

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