Ela Keegan | National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Ela Keegan

Interviewee Description Interviewer Date of Interview Location of Interview Affiliation Collection
Willis Spear Jr.

Willis Spears Jr. speaks about his 54 years as a commercial fisherman off of Cousins Island, ME, focusing on the history of shrimping, the differences between dragging and trapping shrimp, and the changes in the Portland working waterfront over his lifetime. He describes the interaction between fishermen and Portland authorities in their efforts to advocate for the fishing community’s needs and emphasizes the importance of passing information and knowledge to future generations.

Natalie Springuel, Ela Keegan Grand Rapids, MI College of the Atlantic, Maine Sea Grant, The Island Institute, National Working Waterfront Network Collecting Stories at the National Working Waterfronts and Waterways Symposium 2018
Steve Train

Steve Train, a commercial fisherman, speaks about the commercial working waterfront on Long Island, ME, and its relationship and dependence on the Portland working waterfront for commercial fishing, education, and the island communities. He highlights the importance of having access to the waterfront and the challenges Long Island has faced with state control of the water and with the attempts to implement aquaculture.

Corina Gribble , Ela Keegan Grand Rapids, MI College of the Atlantic, Maine Sea Grant, The Island Institute, Working Waterfront Festival Collecting Stories at the National Working Waterfronts and Waterways Symposium 2018
Russ Brohl

Russ Brohl, a retired ship captain and member of the port authority, speaks about South Bass Island, OH—which has a service and tourism driven economy—and its attempts to shift from being a party island to a family destination. He speaks about the importance of protecting the heritage of the area such as the vineyards and voices his concerns relating to tourism, the threat of algal blooms, and invasive species.

Natalie Springuel, Ela Keegan Grand Rapids, MI College of the Atlantic, Maine Sea Grant, The Island Institute, National Working Waterfront Network Collecting Stories at the National Working Waterfronts and Waterways Symposium 2018
Nicole Faghin

Nicole Faghin, a coastal management specialist with Washington Sea Grant based in Seattle, WA, describes her work in the Putrid Sound region of Washington and the challenges of the waterfront having a large industry, land-use conflicts, maritime-related issues, environmental issues, an aging population, and the need to encourage younger generations to work on waterfronts.

Corina Gribble , Ela Keegan Grand Rapids, MI College of the Atlantic, Maine Sea Grant, The Island Institute, National Working Waterfront Network Collecting Stories at the National Working Waterfronts and Waterways Symposium 2018
Michael Wills

From initially moving to Traverse City, MI to open a dive shop, Mike Wills has worked in a variety of waterfront related jobs from working on boats, operating two marinas, opening a community sailing program, and developing three waterfront real estates in downtown Traverse City. He is now the chair of the Discovery Center Great Lakes. As a city that is economically-dependent on the waterfront, Mike describes the current fundraising efforts to help the city develop its waterfront.

Ela Keegan, Corina Gribble Grand Rapids, MI College of the Atlantic, Maine Sea Grant, The Island Institute, National Working Waterfront Network Collecting Stories at the National Working Waterfronts and Waterways Symposium 2018
Matthew Preisser

Working for a non-regulatory group, the Michigan Office of the Great Lakes in Lansing, MI, Matthew Preisser does statewide and regional planning work to protect and restore the Great Lakes and the communities that depend on them. He discusses his work to create a network of Great Lake island communities to elevate the voices of islanders.

Natalie Springuel, Ela Keegan Grand Rapids, MI College of the Atlantic, Maine Sea Grant, The Island Institute, National Working Waterfront Network Collecting Stories at the National Working Waterfronts and Waterways Symposium 2018
Duke Marshall and Mark Nelson

Duke Marshall, a market owner, and Mark Nelson, an accountant, attended the NWWWS to get ideas because Smith island, MD—a small community struggling to retain a year round population, a younger population, and therefore a local culture—is in a time of transition. Their interview focuses on Smith Island’s resilient past with Hurricane Sandy and their plans for the future with the success of creating Smith Island United, which gives them a united voice to advocate for the island.

Natalie Springuel, Ela Keegan Grand Rapids, MI College of the Atlantic, Maine Sea Grant, The Island Institute, National Working Waterfront Network Collecting Stories at the National Working Waterfronts and Waterways Symposium 2018
Chris Kellems

Chris Kellems, a retired sustainable building advisor and passionate citizen of Sturgeon Bay, WI, has observed the struggles of its working waterfront. She attended the NWWWS to gather contacts and examples of successful development and attempts at revitalisation. She discusses her vision for public access to the waterfront, its alternative uses, and the importance of waterfront restoration.

Ela Keegan, Kaitlyn Clark Grand Rapids, MI College of the Atlantic, Maine Sea Grant, The Island Institute, National Working Waterfront Network Collecting Stories at the National Working Waterfronts and Waterways Symposium 2018
Brandon Schroeder

Brandon Schroeder, an extension educator with Michigan Sea Grant from Lincoln, MI, speaks about the interconnection of fisheries, coastal tourism, and fisheries heritage. He focuses on how youth can be part of the future of fisheries and waterfronts, describing the successes and challenges of bringing people together to work on projects such as the Alcona Community High School students working to make interpretive signs for Negwegon State Park, MI.

Natalie Springuel, Ela Keegan Grand Rapids, MI College of the Atlantic, Maine Sea Grant, The Island Institute, National Working Waterfront Network Collecting Stories at the National Working Waterfronts and Waterways Symposium 2018
Andy Dorr

As the town manager of Vinalhaven, ME, Andy Dorr describes his job to be serving as treasurer, tax collector, planner, and financial manager. He describes Vinalhaven as having an authentic working waterfront where the main economy is lobstering and goes on to describe the impacts of recent gentrification, an increase in tourism, attempts to diversify the fisheries, planning for preservation in the reality of sea level rise and increasing storm severity, and the possibility of relocation.

Natalie Springuel, Ela Keegan Grand Rapids, MI College of the Atlantic, Maine Sea Grant, The Island Institute, National Working Waterfront Network Collecting Stories at the National Working Waterfronts and Waterways Symposium 2018