Gordon Waring | National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Gordon Waring

Location of Interview
Collection Name

Voices from the Science Centers

Voices from the Science Centers is an oral history initiative dedicated to documenting the institutional knowledge of fisheries scientists and administrators in the labs of NOAA’s Fisheries Science Centers.

Collection doi
10.VSC/1234567890
Interviewer
Date of Interview
06-27-2016
Audio
Transcript
Biographical Sketch

Gordon Waring was born on July 19, 1946 in Brooklyn, New York. He earned his B.A. in Biology from Humboldt State College, his Master’s from Bridgewater State College, and his Ph.D. in Fisheries and Wildlife Conservation from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. Waring began working for NOAA in 1973 and is a retired former team leader of the seal project within the Protected Species Branch at the Northeast Fisheries Science Center.

Interview contains discussion of: ICNAF quotas, Atlantic herring population, international herring tagging project, Soviet cooperation on fish tagging projects, interactions between Soviet, Polish, German and American scientists, effects of extended jurisdiction, stock assessment review process, establishing preliminary fishery management plans, development of the Protected Species Branch, harbor porpoise protection, East Coast marine mammal surveys, differences between marine mammal surveys in the Northeastand other regions, gray seals on Cape Cod and white sharks on Cape Cod.

In this interview, Gordon Waring gives a rich account of his time working as a scientist at the Northeast Fisheries Science Center. He details his experiences working on international joint projects during the Cold War and his work on seals with the Protected Species Branch at the Northeast Fisheries Science Center.


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The interviews here have been made available to the public only after the interviewer has confirmed that they have obtained consent from the interviewee.