David Vallee | National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

David Vallee

David Vallee
Location of Interview
Collection Name

NOAA 50th Anniversary Oral History Project

As NOAA celebrates its 50th Anniversary in 2020, there is renewed interest in expanding Oral Histories as a key component of the agency’s overall Heritage Program. Through Oral Histories, we will capture the theme: Celebrating the People Behind NOAA - 50 Years of   Science, Service and Stewardship.

principal investigator
Interviewer
Date of Interview
11-08-2019
Transcribers

Molly Graham

Audio
Transcript
Biographical Sketch

David Vallee is the Hydrologist-in-Charge of the National Weather Service’s Northeast River Forecast Center. The center provides detailed water resource and life-saving flood forecasting services to National Weather Service Forecast Offices and the hundreds of federal, state and local water resource entities throughout the Northeast and New York. David has worked for the National Weather Service for 30 years, serving in a variety of positions including Senior Service Hydrologist at the Taunton Weather Forecast Office from 1993-2000 and as Science and Operations Officer from 2001-2006. David started his career right at home as an Intern Meteorologist at the NWS office at T. F. Green Airport. David has extensive experience leading hydrometeorological forecast and warning operations and directing weather research and training programs. David’s research activities span a variety of topics including flooding, severe weather forecasting and orographically enhanced heavy rainfall in southern New England. David has served as the NWS lead investigator with the State University of New York, at Albany, on a multi-year project addressing Land Falling Tropical Cyclones in the Northeastern United States. This research has improved the forecasting of heavy precipitation associated with these land falling tropical cyclones as well as improving our understanding the mechanisms which lead to the recurvature and rapid acceleration of tropical cyclones as they approach the Northeast. David was responsible for development of a new Short Range River Forecasting System which provides hydrologic forecast guidance based on three Numerical Weather Ensemble Predictions Systems. Most recently, David has been leading an effort at the Northeast River Forecast Center to examine changes in precipitation and temperature patterns across New England and their impact on flood behavior. David is most known locally for his outreach and education work on the behavior of New England Hurricanes, including many appearances on local radio and T.V. networks, as well as appearing on documentaries on the Weather Channel, the History Channel and the Discovery Channel. David has been the recipient of numerous regional and national awards including the prestigious National Isaac Cline Award for Leadership. David is a graduate of Lyndon State College. He is a life long resident of the Rhode Island, living in the northeast part of Cumberland, with his wife and two sets of teenage twins. He considers it a tremendous privilege to be serving the people of the very region he calls home.


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By clicking the "I understand" button you acknowledge that the Voices Oral History Archives offers public access to a wide range of accounts, including historical materials, that may contain offensive language or negative stereotypes.

Voices Oral History Archives does not  edit or verify  the accuracy of materials submitted to us. These interviews are presented as part of the historical record.  The opinions expressed in the interviews are those of the interviewee only.

The interviews here have been made available to the public only after the interviewer has confirmed that they have obtained consent from the interviewee.