National Working Waterfront Network | National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

National Working Waterfront Network

Interviewee Description Interviewer Date of Interview Location of Interview Affiliation Collection
Kathy Evans

Kathy Evans, the environmental program manager for the West Michigan Shoreline Development Commission, first became involved with working waterfronts through the clean up and sustainable redevelopment of the Muskegon, MI, waterfront. In her interview, she talks about clean up efforts and their attempts to foster a water-dependent economy in place of the unsustainable, industrial  economy of Muskegon’s past.

Hattie Train , Kaitlyn Clark Grand Rapids, MI University of Maine, College of the Atlantic, Maine Sea Grant, The Island Institute, National Working Waterfront Network Collecting Stories at the National Working Waterfronts and Waterways Symposium 2018
Joseph Lane

Joseph Lane, a academic instructor in geography from Kalamazoo, MI, focuses on the his interest in guided educational tourism of the Great Lakes and his work with lighthouse and waterfront tourism. He describes the touristic, historical, and cultural values of lighthouses in Michigan, highlighting how they can develop tourism.

Alexa Wutt , Kaitlyn Clark Grand Rapids, MI Michigan Sea Grant, College of the Atlantic, Maine Sea Grant, The Island Institute, National Working Waterfront Network Collecting Stories at the National Working Waterfronts and Waterways Symposium 2018
Jim Fawcett

Jim Fawcett, a marine transportation and seaport specialist with the University of Southern California Sea Grant, discusses the competing uses of the Los Angeles, CA, waterfront and highlights the challenges of waterfront access. He questions what would help the waterfront and how creating public access could positively impact the community. He stresses the importance of clean marinas and how the Del Rey neighborhood needs to reverse gentrification to move forward.

Alexa Wutt Grand Rapids, MI Michigan Sea Grant, College of the Atlantic, Maine Sea Grant, The Island Institute, National Working Waterfront Network Collecting Stories at the National Working Waterfronts and Waterways Symposium 2018
Hattie Train

As a lobsterman who earned her license at age 8, Hattie Train speaks about her childhood experience on the commercial waterfront and about her observations of the depletion of fishermen on Long Island, ME. Hattie emphasizes the importance of islanders’ say in decision-making regarding their working waterfront and the neighboring waterfronts that they depend on. She highlights the island’s dependence on the fishing community, the impacts of tourism, and the interdependency of waterfronts.

Natalie Springuel, Corina Gribble Grand Rapids, MI College of the Atlantic, Maine Sea Grant, The Island Institute, National Working Waterfront Network Collecting Stories at the National Working Waterfronts and Waterways Symposium 2018
Duke Marshall and Mark Nelson

Duke Marshall, a market owner, and Mark Nelson, an accountant, attended the NWWWS to get ideas because Smith island, MD—a small community struggling to retain a year round population, a younger population, and therefore a local culture—is in a time of transition. Their interview focuses on Smith Island’s resilient past with Hurricane Sandy and their plans for the future with the success of creating Smith Island United, which gives them a united voice to advocate for the island.

Natalie Springuel, Ela Keegan Grand Rapids, MI College of the Atlantic, Maine Sea Grant, The Island Institute, National Working Waterfront Network Collecting Stories at the National Working Waterfronts and Waterways Symposium 2018
Donald McCann

Donald McCann, a marine surveyor at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science, outlines his job and speaks about the values and challenges (taxes, a diminishing and aging workforce, and lack of public access to the waterfront) of the commercial and recreational waterfront in Fleets Island, VA. He discusses his observations about dredging, the decrease in father-son work on Fleet Island, and Virginia’s master plan for the working waterfront.

Natalie Springuel, Corina Gribble Grand Rapids, MI College of the Atlantic, Maine Sea Grant, The Island Institute, National Working Waterfront Network Collecting Stories at the National Working Waterfronts and Waterways Symposium 2018
Dave Lemberg

Dave Lemberg, a geography professor at Western Michigan University in Kalamazoo, MI, describes the historical use of the Kalamazoo River as a sewer and their recent efforts to diversify its uses as a waterway.

Hattie Train , Corina Gribble Grand Rapids, MI College of the Atlantic, Maine Sea Grant, The Island Institute, National Working Waterfront Network Collecting Stories at the National Working Waterfronts and Waterways Symposium 2018
Dave Alexander

Dave Alexander, the executive director of Downtown Muskegon Now, speaks about the history of the Muskegon Lake, MI, waterfront and how it has brought vitality to the economy and spiritual connections for local inhabitants through having public access to the waterfront with heritage landings and bike trails along the lake.

Alexa Wutt , Kaitlyn Clark Grand Rapids, MI College of the Atlantic, Maine Sea Grant, The Island Institute, National Working Waterfront Network, Michigan Sea Grant Collecting Stories at the National Working Waterfronts and Waterways Symposium 2018
Chris Kellems

Chris Kellems, a retired sustainable building advisor and passionate citizen of Sturgeon Bay, WI, has observed the struggles of its working waterfront. She attended the NWWWS to gather contacts and examples of successful development and attempts at revitalisation. She discusses her vision for public access to the waterfront, its alternative uses, and the importance of waterfront restoration.

Ela Keegan, Kaitlyn Clark Grand Rapids, MI College of the Atlantic, Maine Sea Grant, The Island Institute, National Working Waterfront Network Collecting Stories at the National Working Waterfronts and Waterways Symposium 2018
Brandon Schroeder

Brandon Schroeder, an extension educator with Michigan Sea Grant from Lincoln, MI, speaks about the interconnection of fisheries, coastal tourism, and fisheries heritage. He focuses on how youth can be part of the future of fisheries and waterfronts, describing the successes and challenges of bringing people together to work on projects such as the Alcona Community High School students working to make interpretive signs for Negwegon State Park, MI.

Natalie Springuel, Ela Keegan Grand Rapids, MI College of the Atlantic, Maine Sea Grant, The Island Institute, National Working Waterfront Network Collecting Stories at the National Working Waterfronts and Waterways Symposium 2018