National Working Waterfront Network | National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

National Working Waterfront Network

Interviewee Description Interviewer Date of Interview Location of Interview Affiliation Collection
Willis Spear Jr.

Willis Spears Jr. speaks about his 54 years as a commercial fisherman off of Cousins Island, ME, focusing on the history of shrimping, the differences between dragging and trapping shrimp, and the changes in the Portland working waterfront over his lifetime. He describes the interaction between fishermen and Portland authorities in their efforts to advocate for the fishing community’s needs and emphasizes the importance of passing information and knowledge to future generations.

Natalie Springuel, Ela Keegan Grand Rapids, MI College of the Atlantic, Maine Sea Grant, The Island Institute, National Working Waterfront Network Collecting Stories at the National Working Waterfronts and Waterways Symposium 2018
Russ Brohl

Russ Brohl, a retired ship captain and member of the port authority, speaks about South Bass Island, OH—which has a service and tourism driven economy—and its attempts to shift from being a party island to a family destination. He speaks about the importance of protecting the heritage of the area such as the vineyards and voices his concerns relating to tourism, the threat of algal blooms, and invasive species.

Natalie Springuel, Ela Keegan Grand Rapids, MI College of the Atlantic, Maine Sea Grant, The Island Institute, National Working Waterfront Network Collecting Stories at the National Working Waterfronts and Waterways Symposium 2018
Roland Lewis

Roland Lewis, the president and CEO of the Waterfront Alliance, speaks about how New York City, NY, is a critical waterfront for the maritime ecosystem as the largest port on the eastern seaboard. He discusses the impacts of opening the Erie Canal, the wind turbines off the coast of New York, and issues of zoning of waterfront and maritime facilities. He highlights successes of his work communicating between waterfront-based activities and the importance of having political leaders engaged with the working waterfront.

Alexa Wutt , Kaitlyn Clark Grand Rapids, MI Michigan Sea Grant, College of the Atlantic, Maine Sea Grant, The Island Institute, National Working Waterfront Network Collecting Stories at the National Working Waterfronts and Waterways Symposium 2018
Peter Huston

Peter Huston, a filmmaker from South Bass Island, OH, attended the symposium as part of the coalition of island communities. He discusses the history of waterfront use in Put-in-Bay, OH, from industry to wine making and currently to transportation. He addresses challenges around the high water level negatively impacting the transportation economy and the difficulty of keeping access points open. Huston’s vision is for the sustainable growth of the waterfront.

 

Alexa Wutt Grand Rapids, MI Michigan Sea Grant, College of the Atlantic, Maine Sea Grant, The Island Institute, National Working Waterfront Network Collecting Stories at the National Working Waterfronts and Waterways Symposium 2018
Nicole Faghin

Nicole Faghin, a coastal management specialist with Washington Sea Grant based in Seattle, WA, describes her work in the Putrid Sound region of Washington and the challenges of the waterfront having a large industry, land-use conflicts, maritime-related issues, environmental issues, an aging population, and the need to encourage younger generations to work on waterfronts.

Corina Gribble , Ela Keegan Grand Rapids, MI College of the Atlantic, Maine Sea Grant, The Island Institute, National Working Waterfront Network Collecting Stories at the National Working Waterfronts and Waterways Symposium 2018
Michael Wills

From initially moving to Traverse City, MI to open a dive shop, Mike Wills has worked in a variety of waterfront related jobs from working on boats, operating two marinas, opening a community sailing program, and developing three waterfront real estates in downtown Traverse City. He is now the chair of the Discovery Center Great Lakes. As a city that is economically-dependent on the waterfront, Mike describes the current fundraising efforts to help the city develop its waterfront.

Ela Keegan, Corina Gribble Grand Rapids, MI College of the Atlantic, Maine Sea Grant, The Island Institute, National Working Waterfront Network Collecting Stories at the National Working Waterfronts and Waterways Symposium 2018
Meaghan Gass

Meaghan Gass, an extension educator with Michigan Sea Grant based out of Bay City, MI, speaks about her projects on extreme floods and her passion for place-based stewardship education. She highlights the United States’ dependence on the Great Lakes and the interconnectedness of waterfronts. Her work currently includes projects such as reef restoration, invasive species removal, fisheries, and water quality in the Saganon Bay region of Michigan.

 

Corina Gribble , Kaitlyn Clark Grand Rapids, MI College of the Atlantic, Maine Sea Grant, The Island Institute, National Working Waterfront Network Collecting Stories at the National Working Waterfronts and Waterways Symposium 2018
Matthew Preisser

Working for a non-regulatory group, the Michigan Office of the Great Lakes in Lansing, MI, Matthew Preisser does statewide and regional planning work to protect and restore the Great Lakes and the communities that depend on them. He discusses his work to create a network of Great Lake island communities to elevate the voices of islanders.

Natalie Springuel, Ela Keegan Grand Rapids, MI College of the Atlantic, Maine Sea Grant, The Island Institute, National Working Waterfront Network Collecting Stories at the National Working Waterfronts and Waterways Symposium 2018
Matt Campo

Matt Campo, a senior research specialist at Rutgers University, speaks about the industrial and commercial uses of waterfronts with a focus on Red Bank, NJ. Highlighting water-dependent businesses, he encourages communication between different commercial uses. He discusses the difficulty of beach badges and land use rights in New Jersey but positively looks towards conversations about resilience and preservation for the public health and social welfare of coastal communities.

Natalie Springuel, Corina Gribble Grand Rapids, MI College of the Atlantic, Maine Sea Grant, The Island Institute, National Working Waterfront Network Collecting Stories at the National Working Waterfronts and Waterways Symposium 2018
Kenneth Walker

Kenneth Walker, a program analyst for NOAA based in Silver Spring, MD, speaks about his view of the national waterfront, why working waterfronts are an important piece of the blue economy, and his attempts to create and share economic and environmental tools for resilience in coastal communities. He addresses various nationwide challenges such as sea level rise and touches on the Portland, ME, waterfront in which he is working on projects highlighting the importance of peer-to-peer learning.

Corina Gribble , Kaitlyn Clark Grand Rapids, MI College of the Atlantic, Maine Sea Grant, The Island Institute, National Working Waterfront Network Collecting Stories at the National Working Waterfronts and Waterways Symposium 2018